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“Miracle Cure” Diets

“Miracle” or “Amazing” Diets

Miracle Cures for Dieters

Some dieters peg their hopes on pills and capsules that promise to “burn,” “block,” “flush,” or otherwise eliminate fat from the system. But science has yet to come up with a low-risk “magic bullet” for weight loss. Some pills may help control the appetite, but they can have serious side effects. (Amphetamines, for instance, are highly addictive and can have an adverse impact on the heart and central nervous system.) Other pills are utterly worthless.

Beware of the following products that are touted as weight-loss wonders:

Diet patches, which are worn on the skin, have not been proven to be safe or effective. The FDA has seized millions of these products from manufacturers and promoters.

“Fat blockers” purport to physically absorb fat and mechanically interfere with the fat a person eats.

“Starch blockers” promise to block or impede starch digestion. Not only is the claim unproven, but users have complained of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach pains.

“Magnet” diet pills allegedly “flush fat out of the body.” The FTC has brought legal action against several marketers of these pills.

Glucomannan is advertised as the “Weight Loss Secret That’s Been in the Orient for Over 500 Years.” There is little evidence supporting this plant root’s effectiveness as a weight-loss product.

Some bulk producers or fillers, such as fiber-based products, may absorb liquid and swell in the stomach, thereby reducing hunger. Some fillers, such as guar gum, can even prove harmful, causing obstructions in the intestines, stomach, or esophagus. The FDA has taken legal action against several promoters containing guar gum.

Spirulina, a species of blue-green algae, has not been proven effective for losing weight.

SOURCE: Excerpted from FDA/FTC/NAAG: The Facts about Weight Loss Products and Programs.

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